The forgotten First Olympic swimmer of British India

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Nalin Malik with me and my father. Calcutta, West Bengal. December, 1950

Nalin Malik with me and my father. Calcutta, West Bengal. December, 1950 Image and Narrative contributed by Abhijit Das Gupta, Kolkata This image was photographed in Calcutta (Now Kolkata) in 1950. I was about four years old. My Father used to take me to the swimming club in Dhakuria lake (now Rabindra Sarovar). The pool in the club doesn’t exist any more. In the picture, a man called Nalin Malik is on the left, and behind us swims my father. Nalin Malik was our swimming trainer and what is not known is that Nalin Malik represented the British India in the 1932 Olympics held in Los Angeles, USA . He never had any formal training, in fact he was so poor that he could not even afford full meals. From what I know, my uncle, Pankaj Gupta, also a sports legend spotted Nalin swimming in the Ganges. Pankaj Gupta was a sports administrator and he too began his career with the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. He was a manager and coach to the Indian contingent and managed several sports events across Europe and the USA. Nalin Malik stood fourth in the 400 Meters Swimming Heat 4. He swam without even a proper swimming costume. People used to say Nalin Malik did not swim – he mowed the water apart. The unfortunate part is that he remained an unacknowledged, secluded, and a very lonely man whom no one remembered or paid tribute to. I however, have fond memories of him. He was a very tough trainer. On this day in a cold December in 1950, he made me cross the lake. The return was on his back.

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The untouchable Brahmin who saved Gandhi’s life

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My Great-grandfather, Krishnaswamy Iyer with Mahatma Gandhi. Palakkad, Kerala. June 1945

My Great-grandfather, Krishnaswamy Iyer with Mahatma Gandhi. Palakkad, Kerala. June 1945 Image and Narrative contributed by Govind Mohandas, Bengaluru This image of my great grandfather Krishnaswamy Iyer with Mahatma Gandhi, was photographed at the Sabari Ashram in Palakkad, Kerala.  Although an ignored statue with a broken nose stands in a park in Kerala and a book has chronicled him as the Untouchable Brahmin, my Great-grand father Krishnaswamy Iyer is a forgotten hero. Born in 1890, he was brought up in a very orthodox Brahmin family and he soon found himself in the epicenter of the freedom struggle from British rule. He courageously started displaying his social responsibility by educating and initiating Dalits (untouchables) into Brahminhood much to the fury of the elders in the community. When he showed no signs of listening to their advice, Krishna was ostracized from his community. It was a huge deal, but Krishna was undeterred. He continued his service for the untouchables through the Sabari Ashram that stands even today, which is committed to the cause of educating Dalits. Mahatma Gandhi knew and adored Krishna and always paid him a visit during each of his tours to southern India. There are anecdotes which mention an incident when Krishna saved Gandhiji from riots by stopping a train and taking Gandhiji to a safe place before the train reached the station. He was the 'untouchable Brahmin', yet he garnered a lot of respect from few members of the Brahmin community, among them being my mother's family. Once the alliance between my mother and father was recommended to my maternal great-grandfather, there was no doubt that she had to be married to Krishnaswamy Iyer's grandson. Krishnaswamy Iyer passed…

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