As a magistrate he could impose a large fine of Rs.10

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My Great Great Grandfather, Mukuntha Madhav Reddy Yekollu, Zamindar of Yelagiri. (far left, with hands folded) with associates from the region. Jolarpet, Tamil Nadu. Circa 1880

My Great Great Grandfather, Mukuntha Madhav Reddy Yekollu, Zamindar of Yelagiri. (far left, with hands folded) with associates. Jolarpet, Tamil Nadu. Circa 1880 Image and Narrative contributed by Sanjay, UK This photograph of my Great great grandfather Mukuntha Madhav Reddy Yekollu (sitting far left, on chair) was taken in my ancestral home in Yelagiri near Jolarpet. He later went on to become a honorary civil magistrate/judge with a capacity to impose fines upto Rs.10 ( a princely sum then). He committed suicide in 1907 for reasons no one knew, but we conjecture- it was depression. All I know of the two European gentleman in the picture is that one was a Railway supervisor of Jolarpet which was an important railway junction. The other was a Police Inspector of Italian origin. My Great Great Grandfather was educated up to form three. He had two wives, four sons, six to seven daughters and an elder brother who died on the eve of his marriage. The last time I visited  my ancestral home in India I also found a letter that was never posted (Dated : 1927) With an interest to find out more about my ancestry I searched and found distant uncles and aunts. Some were not welcoming at all, and some wouldn't allow old photographs to be scanned. This photo was given to me by my great grand father's sister's son. He thought it would be better off with me than him.

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The most dangerous man in Bombay Presidency

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My Grandfather (sitting, left) Narasinhbhai Patel with family. According to British Indian records, he was 'the most dangerous man in Bombay Presidency'. Anand, Kheda District, Gujarat. Circa 1940

My Grandfather (sitting, left) Narasinhbhai Patel with family. Anand, Kheda District, Gujarat. Circa 1940 Image and Narrative contributed by Sandhya Mehta My maternal grandfather, Narasinhbhai was a revolutionary man. Records of British India describe him as 'most dangerous man in Bombay Presidency '. He was exiled from British India for writing proscribed books. Though the Maharaja of Baroda clandestinely supported him. After completing his exile term in Germany and East Africa, C.F. Andrews persuaded him to join Ravindranath Tagore in Shantiniketan . He taught German there for a short time and then returned to his native town Kheda to support Gandhiji's Salt Satyagraha . He became a leader in Kheda district. to mobilise Satyagraha. Standing behind him, first from left is his grandson Dr. Shantibhai Patel who also actively participated in the freedom struggle and later became a successful scientist . Narsinhbhai's daughter, Shanta Patel (my mother), sits, first from right with my father G.P.Patel, standing behind her. My father, G.P Patel supported Narasinhbhai's views, work and philosophy. They all were followers of Gandhiji.

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