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31 – She studied only up to Class 5, but was a well-read person subsequently

The wedding of my parents. My father, Dr. Gadepally Subbarayudu and Mother, Venkata Ratnalamma, Visakhapatnam, (then Vizagapatam), Andhra Pradesh. Circa 1919

Image and text contribution by Lft. Col (Retd.) Dr. G.Kameswararao, Secundarabad

This photo was taken at the wedding of my parents. My Father, Dr. Gadepally Subbarayudu was a medical doctor. My mother, Venkata Ratnalamma was a housewife and studied only upto 5th class, but was a well-read person subsequently. I, Gadepally Kameswara Rao, am their second child, a graduate in Medicine and a post-graduate in Public Health. My wife, late Lakshmi Devi, nee Mokkarala, was a housewife. I served in private institutions, the Andhra Pradesh State government and the Army Medical Corps. I was born on July 23, 1932, and am now 78 years old .

– The Contributor is a financial patron of Indian Memory Project

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One Response

  1. Sindhu says:

    The MADHUPARKALU worn by the couple are in use even now in Telugu weddings. Wrist watches were a rare possession at that period obviously as the bridegroom is showcasing it prominently in this pose ! As a Doctor it was surely a necessity for him to be able to count the pulse and respiration rates of patients in the absence of present -day gadgets of stop watches in mobile phones and pulse-oxymeters /cardiac monitors ! The wooden sandals sported by him , a thing of the past , remind one of the PAADUKAs given by SREERAMA to BHARAT with which the latter anointed the throne until SREERAMA’S return to Ayodhya from his exile . Theses wooden sandals have been replacerd by Hawai Chappals now-a-days. The bride’s barefeet show how the women were expected to be in days of yore. The camphor garlands are even now popular and are a MUST in all Telugu weddings. Those wooden chaIrs were everlasting and their quality is unmatchable now when the USE and THROW culture has pervaded to enable the industrial sector survive !

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